REVIEWS
      VIDEOS
      DOWNLOADS
      BONUS MODS
       WOLFPACK
       BOOKS
      TACTICS/TIPS
       NEWS
       FORUMS
       GAME STORE
       ARTICLES
        DISCORD
       LINKS
       CONTACT US
        HOME

 

Online since 1997

SUBSIM   TACTICS   &   TIPS

Boot Disk Tutorial

Boot Disk

The fastest way to correct the majority of all problems with old games is to make a boot disk. The main function of a boot disk is to configure your system optimally for a specific application or game. The boot disk removes any applications or programs that might conflict with the game and optimally configures the memory to meet the game's requirements. Creating a boot disk will not alter the startup files on your hard drive. To restore your system to "normal", simply remove the boot disk and restart your computer.

Unfortunately, since everyone's systems are not exactly the same, a degree of "tinkering" is required from time to time.

BOOT DISK MAKER  This executable file will make a boot floppy that has been especially optimized for best DOS game performance. It includes emm386 hi-memory manager, a mouse driver, and configuration for Sound Blaster emulation drivers (note, these drivers have to be downloaded below). Just double-click the executable, insert a floppy into the drive, and the rest is done by the program.

Sound Blaster emulation drivers  This driver emulates sound in DOS mode for newer generation Creative Labs Sound Blasters. These include SB Live!, SB 128, SB 64 and similar. The manual that explains how to set the default values is included, but if you download the Boot Disk Maker, all the values have already been set. All you have to do is copy them to a directory that is specified in autoexec.bat on the floppy.

 

Instructions For Making a Boot Disk Manually

If Windows 95 is preinstalled on your system, the DOS drivers (CD-ROM drive, video card, mouse, and sound card.) may not be present. Please contact your computer manufacturer for the DOS drivers for the hardware stated above and then add these new drivers to the boot disk.

------ 2 ------

Check out Examples Of Startup Files for information on startup files (AUTOEXEC.BAT and CONFIG.SYS).

Click on the operating system that you are using to view custom boot disk instructions:

  • WINDOWS 95

  • WINDOWS 3.X and DOS
       

 

BOOT DISK INSTRUCTIONS FOR WINDOWS 95/98

We recommend using a new unformatted floppy disk. If you have high density disk drives, use only high density disks.

  1. Exit Windows 95/98 To MS-DOS Mode.

     
    1. Click on the "START" button
    2. Click on "SHUT DOWN"
    3. Select "RESTART YOUR COMPUTER IN MS-DOS MODE"
    4. At your Windows prompt type: CD\ <ENTER>

       
  2. Format The Disk As A System Disk.

     
    1. Place the high density diskette in your "A" drive.
    2. At your C:\ prompt type: FORMAT A: /S <ENTER>
      This will format the diskette in the "A" drive and copy the system files to it.

       
  3. Copy Necessary Files To The Boot Disk.

     
    1. At your C:\ prompt type: COPY CONFIG.SYS A: <ENTER>
      It should respond with "1 file(s) copied."
    2. Then type: COPY AUTOEXEC.BAT A: <ENTER>
      It should respond with "1 file(s) copied."

       
  4. Change To Your "A" Drive And Confirm That The Files Are Present.

     
    1. At your C:\ prompt type: A: <ENTER>
      Your prompt should change to A:\ then type: DIR <ENTER>
      You should see a list of three files:

       
      • COMMAND.COM
      • CONFIG.SYS
      • AUTOEXEC.BAT

         
    2. If you see these three files present your boot disk is now complete and ready to be edited as necessary. If not, repeat the procedures above or try using a different diskette.


       
  5. Edit The CONFIG.SYS And AUTOEXEC.BAT To Resemble The Ones Provided Below.

    Make sure that you leave in any lines that pertain to your CD-ROM or soundcard. Also, if you are using a disk compression utility such as Stacker or Doublespace, you must leave in the necessary device driver lines.

     

    1. Edit The CONFIG.SYS File
      1. Change to your "A" drive by typing: A: <ENTER>
      2. Type EDIT CONFIG.SYS <ENTER>
      3. Please edit your CONFIG.SYS file on the boot disk as follows:

      DEVICEHIGH=C:\WINDOWS\HIMEM.SYS

      DEVICEHIGH=C:\WINDOWS\EMM386.EXE 4096 RAM D=256 I=B000-B7FF
      [See note for AST Computers]*

      DEVICEHIGH=C:\WINDOWS\DRVSPACE.SYS /MOVE
      [See Special Note]**

      DOS=HIGH,UMB

      DEVICEHIGH=[Sound card driver lines]

      DEVICEHIGH=[CD-ROM driver line]***

      FILES=40

      BUFFERS=40

      STACKS=9,256

      LASTDRIVE=Z

       

      *AST Computers need to include X=C000-CFFF at the end of the EMM386 statement. For example: DEVICEHIGH=C:\WINDOWS\EMM386.EXE 4096 RAM D=256 I=B000-B7FF X=C000-CFFF

      ** Special Note: Do NOT add this line if you do not have either the DRVSPACE.SYS or DBLSPACE.SYS lines are in your CONFIG.SYS on your hard drive. If one of the two lines is present then it MUST be added as shown above. In the case of the presence of DBLSPACE.SYS, simply substitute the DBLSPACE.SYS in place of the DRVSPACE.SYS.

      *** CD-ROM Drivers: The CD-ROM drive line is only required on CD-ROM games. If you are making a boot disk for a floppy disk game (i.e., Monkey Island 1) then you can omit the CD-ROM driver line from the boot disk.

      When you are finished editing the CONFIG.SYS file, save your changes. To save changes:
      1. Hold down the ALT key and press the letter "F".
        A menu box should appear in the upper left hand corner.
      2. Press the letter "X" to select "EXIT."
        A screen prompting you to save the file should appear.
      3. Press the letter "Y" to answer "Yes" to save the file.
        This action should save the file and return you to an A:\ prompt.

       

    2. Edit The AUTOEXEC.BAT File
    1. Change to your "A" drive by typing: A: <ENTER>
    2. At your "A" drive, type: EDIT AUTOEXEC.BAT <ENTER> AUTOEXEC.BAT <ENTER>
    3. Please edit the AUTOEXEC.BAT file on the boot disk as follows:

     

    PATH=C:\WINDOWS;C:\WINDOWS\COMMAND

    LH [Add sound card driver lines here]

    SET BLASTER= [Copy this line from the C:\ drive]

    LH [Add CD-ROM driver line] *

    LH [Add the mouse driver here] **

    C:

    * The CD-ROM drive line is only required on CD-ROM games. Here is an example of a CD-ROM driver line in the autoexec.bat file:

    C:\WINDOWS\COMMAND\MSCDEX.EXE /D:MSCD001 /M:10

    If you are making a boot disk for a floppy disk game then you can omit the CD-ROM driver line from the boot disk.

    ** On some joystick intensive games, we do not recommend loading the mouse driver since it may conflict with the joystick. Examples of joystick intensive games are X-Wing and TIE Fighter.

    1. When you are finished editing the AUTOEXEC.BAT file, save your changes. To save changes:
    1. Hold down the ALT key and press the letter "F".
      A menu box should appear in the upper left hand corner.
    2. Press the letter "X" to select "EXIT."
      A screen prompting you to save the file should appear.
    3. Press the letter "Y" to answer "Yes" to save the file.
      This action should save the file and return you to an A:\ prompt.

       
  6. Restart The Computer With The Boot Disk In The "A" Drive.

     
  7. Once the CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT have been edited, your boot disk is ready to be used. Reboot the system by either using a warm or cold boot. The computer will boot you to:  C\:>

     
    • Warm boot: First, leave the boot disk in the "A" drive. Hold down the CTRL and ALT keys at the same time, while holding these keys down, press the DEL key. This will reboot your computer. If your are having trouble with a warm boot, try a cold boot.
    • Cold boot: First, remove all disks out of disk drives. Turn off the computer manually and wait for the machine to stop running. Place the boot disk in the "A" drive and turn on the machine.

     

  8. Follow The Game's Instructions On How To Enter The Game From DOS.


 

BOOT DISK INSTRUCTIONS FOR WINDOWS 3.X AND DOS

We recommend using a new unformatted floppy disk. If you have high density disk drives, use only high density disks.

  1. Exit Windows95 To MS-DOS Mode.

     
    1. Click on "FILE" from the "PROGRAM MANAGER" in Windows.
    2. Select "EXIT WINDOWS"
      A window will appear "THIS WILL END YOUR WINDOWS SESSION."
    3. Select "OK"

       
  2. Format The Disk As A System Disk.

     
    1. Place the high density diskette in your "A" drive.
    2. At your C:\ prompt type: FORMAT A: /S <ENTER>
      This will format the diskette in the "A" drive and copy the system files to it.

       
  3. Copy Necessary Files To The Boot Disk.

     
    1. At your C:\ prompt type: COPY CONFIG.SYS A: <ENTER>
      It should respond with "1 file(s) copied."
    2. Then type: COPY AUTOEXEC.BAT A: <ENTER>
      It should respond with "1 file(s) copied."

       
  4. Change To Your "A" Drive And Confirm That The Files Are Present.

     
    1. At your C:\ prompt type: A: <ENTER>
      Your prompt should change to A:\ then type: DIR <ENTER>
      You should see a list of three files:

       
      • COMMAND.COM
      • CONFIG.SYS
      • AUTOEXEC.BAT

         
    2. If you see these three files present your boot disk is now complete and ready to be edited as necessary. If not, repeat the procedures above or try using a different diskette.


       
  5. Edit The CONFIG.SYS And AUTOEXEC.BAT To Resemble The Ones Provided Below.

    Make sure that you leave in any lines that pertain to your CD-ROM or soundcard. Also, if you are using a disk compression utility such as Stacker or Doublespace, you must leave in the necessary device driver lines.

     

    1. Edit The CONFIG.SYS File
      1. Change to your "A" drive by typing: A: <ENTER>
      2. Type: EDIT CONFIG.SYS <ENTER>
      3. Please edit your CONFIG.SYS file on the boot disk as follows:

         

      DEVICEHIGH=C:\WINDOWS\HIMEM.SYS

      DEVICEHIGH=C:\WINDOWS\EMM386.EXE 4096 RAM D=256 I=B000-B7FF
      [See note for AST Computers] *

      DEVICEHIGH=C:\WINDOWS\DRVSPACE.SYS /MOVE
      [See Special Note] **

      DOS=HIGH,UMB

      DEVICEHIGH=[Sound card driver lines]

      DEVICEHIGH=[CD-ROM driver line] ***

      FILES=40

      BUFFERS=40

      STACKS=9,256

      LASTDRIVE=Z

      * AST Computers need to include X=C000-CFFF at the end of the EMM386 statement. For example: DEVICEHIGH=C:\WINDOWS\EMM386.EXE 4096 RAM D=256 I=B000-B7FF X=C000-CFFF>

      ** Special Note: Do NOT add this line if you do not have either the DRVSPACE.SYS or DBLSPACE.SYS lines are in your CONFIG.SYS on your hard drive. If one of the two lines is present then it MUST be added as shown above. In the case of the presence of DBLSPACE.SYS, simply substitute the DBLSPACE.SYS in place of the DRVSPACE.SYS.

      *** CD-ROM Drivers: The CD-ROM drive line is only required on CD-ROM games. If you are making a boot disk for a floppy disk game (i.e., Monkey Island 1) then you can omit the CD-ROM driver line from the boot disk.

      1. When you are finished editing the CONFIG.SYS file, save your changes. To save changes:
      1. Hold down the ALT key and press the letter "F".
        A menu box should appear in the upper left hand corner.
      2. Press the letter "X" to select "EXIT."
        A screen prompting you to save the file should appear.
      3. Press the letter "Y" to answer "Yes" to save the file.
        This action should save the file and return you to an A:\ prompt.
    2. Edit The AUTOEXEC.BAT File

       
      1. Change to your "A" drive by typing: A: <ENTER>
      2. At your "A" drive and type: EDIT AUTOEXEC.BAT <ENTER>
      3. Please edit the AUTOEXEC.BAT file on the boot disk as follows:

       

      PATH=C:\WINDOWS;C:\WINDOWS\COMMAND

      LH [Add sound card driver lines here]

      SET BLASTER= [Copy this line from the C:\ drive]

      LH [Add CD-ROM driver line] *

      LH [Add the mouse driver here] **

      C:

       

      * The CD-ROM drive line is only required on CD-ROM games. Here is an example of a CD-ROM driver line in the autoexec.bat file:

      C:\WINDOWS\COMMAND\MSCDEX.EXE /D:MSCD001 /M:10

      If you are making a boot disk for a floppy disk game (i.e., Monkey Island 1) then you can omit the CD-ROM driver line from the boot disk.

      ** On some joystick intensive games, we do not recommend loading the mouse driver since it may conflict with the joystick. Examples of joystick intensive games are X-Wing and TIE Fighter.

      1. When you are finished editing the AUTOEXEC.BAT file, save your changes. To save changes:
      1. Hold down the ALT key and press the letter "F".
        A menu box should appear in the upper left hand corner.
      2. Press the letter "X" to select "EXIT."
        A screen prompting you to save the file should appear.
      3. Press the letter "Y" to answer "Yes" to save the file.
        This action should save the file and return you to an A:\ prompt.


     

  6. Restart The Computer With The Boot Disk In The "A" Drive.

    Once the CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT have been edited, your boot disk is ready to be used. Reboot the system by either using a warm or cold boot. The computer will boot you to:  C\:>

     

    • Warm boot: First, leave the boot disk in the "A" drive. Hold down the CTRL and ALT keys at the same time, while holding these keys down, press the DEL key. This will reboot your computer. If your are having trouble with a warm boot, try a cold boot.
    • Cold boot: First, remove all disks out of disk drives. Turn off the computer manually and wait for the machine to stop running. Place the boot disk in the "A" drive and turn on the machine.

       
  7. Follow The Game's Instructions On How To Enter The Game From DOS.

Startup File Examples

These examples will give you an idea of what you can expect in your startup files. Please keep in mind that these are some basic examples of startup files. Your actual startup files could vary quite a bit, due to the thousands of possible computer configurations available on the market today.

Example #1
A system with Windows 3.x or Dos 6.x
Example #2
Preinstalled Windows 95
Example #3
A system upgraded to Windows 95
Example #4
A system with Quarter-deck (QEMM) installed
Example #5
Some Packard Bell systems
Example #6
Some IBM Personal Computers

 

EXAMPLE #1

CONFIG.SYS

DEVICE=C:\DOS\HIMEM.SYS
DEVICE=C:\DOS\EMM386.EXE RAM 2560
DEVICEHIGH=C:\WINDOWS\DRVSPACE.SYS /MOVE
STACKS=9,256
DEVICE=C:\scsi\aspi8dos.sys
DEVICE=C:\scsi\aspicd.sys /d:MSCD001
BUFFERS=40
FILES=40

AUTOEXEC.BAT

SET SOUND=C:\SB16\CTSND
SET MIDI=SYNTH:1 MAP:E MODE:0
SET BLASTER=A220 I5 D1 H5 P330 T6 E620
C:\MCAFEE\SCAN.EXE C:\
@IF ERRORLEVEL 1 PAUSE
CALL C:\DIAM-DOS\DMS MONITOR
PATH=C:\DOS;C:\WINDOWS
C:\DOS\MSCDEX.EXE /D:MSCD001 /M:20

 

EXAMPLE #2

CONFIG.SYS

DEVICE=C:\dosdrvrs\aoatapi.sys /d:idecdooo
files=40
buffers=40
lastdrive=z

AUTOEXEC.BAT

@echo off
set blaster=a220 i5 d1

 

EXAMPLE #3

CONFIG.SYS

DEVICE=C:\WINDOWS\HIMEM.SYS
DEVICE=C:\WINDOWS\EMM386.EXE NOEMS
BUFFERS=23,0
FILES=50
DOS=UMB
LASTDRIVE=K
FCBS=4,0
DEVICEHIGH /L:1,16976 =C:\WINDOWS\SETVER.EXE
DOS=HIGH
rem ---------- MTM ATAPI CD-ROM -----------
DEVICEHIGH /L:1,14464 =C:\MTM\MTMCDAI.SYS /D:MTMIDE01
rem ---------- MTM ATAPI CD-ROM -----------

AUTOEXEC.BAT

rem C:\PROGRA~1\MCAFEE\VIRUSS~1\SCAN.EXE C:\
rem @IF ERRORLEVEL 1 PAUSE
@IF ERRORLEVEL 1 PAUSE
REM - By Windows Setup - SET BLASTER=A220 Ixx Dx T1
rem SET BLASTER=A220 I5 D1 H5 P330 T6
REM - By Windows Setup - SET SNDSCAPE=C:\SNDSCAPE
rem ---------- MTM ATAPI CD-ROM ----------
rem - By Windows Setup - C:\WINDOWS\COMMAND\MSCDEX.EXE /S /D:MTMIDE01 /M:10
rem ---------- MTM ATAPI CD-ROM ----------
@ECHO OFF
PROMPT $p$g
PATH C:\WINDOWS;C:\WINDOWS\COMMAND;C:\DOS;C:\MACH64;D:\CPACK
PATH=%PATH%
SET MSINPUT=C:\MSINPUT
rem - By Windows Setup - C:\MSINPUT\MOUSE\MOUSE.EXE /Q
SET TEMP=C:\DOS
SET PIMS=D:\CPACK
LH C:\WINDOWS\SmartDrv

 

EXAMPLE #4 (QEMM)

CONFIG.SYS

DEVICE=C:\qemm\dosdata.sys
DEVICE=C:\WIN95\SETVER.EXE
DEVICE=C:\QEMM\QEMM386.SYS RAM ARAM=B080-B7FF R:1
DEVICE=C:\qemm\dos-up.sys @c:\qemm\dos-up.dat
DEVICE=C:\QEMM\LOADHI.SYS /R:1 /SIZE=11520 C:\QEMM\QDPMI.SYS SWAPFILE=DPMI.SWP SWAPSIZE=1024 NOVM
stacks=0,0
buffers=60
DOS=HIGH, UMB
DEVICE=C:\QEMM\LOADHI.SYS /R:1 /SIZE=24096 \SAMSUNG\SSCDROM.SYS /D:SSCD000
SHELL=C:\COMMAND.COM C:\ /P /e:2048
DEVICE=C:\QEMM\LOADHI.SYS /R:1 /SIZE=4000 C:\WIN95\IFSHLP.SYS
DEVICE=C:\stacker\stachigh.sys
DEVICE=C:\stacker\dpms.exe

AUTOEXEC.BAT

rem C:\SDD53\UNIVBE.EXE -w
rem C:\SDD53\UNIPOWER.EXE
rem C:\SDD53\MKACCEL.EXE -gen
C:\qemm\loadhi /r:1 /res=29232 /sqf smartdrv.exe
SET SOUND=C:\PROGRA~1\CREATIVE\CTSND
SET MIDI=SYNTH:1 MAP:E MODE:0
SET BLASTER=A220 I5 D1 H5 P330 E640 T6
rem - By Windows Setup - C:\WIN95\COMMAND\MSCDEX.EXE /D:SSCD000
@ECHO OFF
PROMPT $p$g
SET PATH=C:\QTW\BIN;C:\BATCH;C:\QEMM;C:\WIN95\COMMAND;C:\DOS;
SET TEMP=C:\DOS
SET PGPPATH=C:\UTIL\PGP
SET TZ=EST5EDT
SET DJGPP=g:\pilot\runwayc\djgpp.env
rem C:\syntouch\syntouch

 

EXAMPLE #5 (Some Packard Bell Systems)

CONFIG.SYS

DEVICE=C:\WINDOWS\HIMEM.SYS
DOS=HIGH,UMB
DEVICE=C:\WINDOWS\EMM386.EXE NOEMS I=B000-B7FF
FILESHIGH=30
BUFFERSHIGH=20
STACKSHIGH=0,0
FCBSHIGH=1
DEVICEHIGH=C:\WINDOWS\MOUSE.SYS
DEVICEHIGH=C:\PBTOOLS\NEC_IDE.SYS /D:MSCD0001

AUTOEXEC.BAT

C:\SOUND144\UTILITY\AZCAL.EXE
@ECHO OFF
PROMPT $P$G
PATH C:\WINDOWS;C:\WINDOWS\COMMAND;C:\
LH C:\WINDOWS\COMMAND\MSCDEX.EXE /D:MSCD0001 /M:20 /S
SET DIRCMD=/O
SET TEMP=C:\PBTOOLS\WINTEMP
SET WINPMT=[WINDOWS] $P$G
SET BLASTER=A220 I5 D1 T4
SET GALAXY=A220 I5 D1 K10 P530 T6
SET SOUND=C:\SOUND144

 

EXAMPLE #6 (Some IBM Computers)

CONFIG.SYS

DEVICE=C:\DOS\HIMEM.SYS /TESTMEM:OFF
DEVICE=C:\WINDOWS\EMM386.EXE NOEMS I=E000-EFFF X=F000-FEFF
DOS=HIGH
BUFFERS=50
FILES=40
DOS=HIGH,UMB
DEVICEHIGH=C:\WINDOWS\COMMAND\IBMIDECD.SYS /D:IBMCD001 /P:170,15 /P:1E0,11
DEVICE=C:\MWW\MANAGER\MWD50460.SYS
REM Removing DWCFGMG.SYS may disable Mwave(games and modem) in native DOS mode
REM DEVICE=C:\MWW\MANAGER\DWCFGMG.SYS

AUTOEXEC.BAT

@ECHO OFF
C:\IBMAV95\IBMAVSH /F00
PATH C:\MWW\DLL;C:\IBMTOOLS
LH DOSKEY
SET MWPATH=C:\MWW\DLL;C:\MWW\MWGAMES;C:\MWW\DSP
REM The following is used by DOS games to recognize Sound Blaster hardware.
REM If hardware settings are changed, please change this line as well.
REM See the Mwave README file for instructions.
SET BLASTER=A220 I5 D1
SET LIBPATH=C:\MWW\DLL
SET MWROOT=C:\MWW
C:\IBMTOOLS\RESUME.EXE
C:\IBMTOOLS\IBMPFILE.EXE

 

 

  Help out with a small donation.
Keep Subsim Review strong with your support! Thanks!!

All tips and contents are
2004 SUBSIM Review
Do not copy without permission.


SOUND ISSUES

 

The horror, the horror

Tip:
Want to check the date on one of your device drivers? Right-click the My Computer icon (or a blank space in My Computer's window), select Properties, and then select the Device Manager tab. Double-click the device's icon, and click on the Driver tab. The information's in there. If the date listed is earlier than that of a driver you've found online, it makes sense to upgrade.
What's that sound? It's...silence! My sound card...it's gone! I must go online and download new drivers. No...noooo! My modem...Windows 98 can't seem to detect it either. Maybe my installation CD-ROM will have the drivers...but...the CD-ROM drive's not listed in My Computer anymore...aaaaaahhh! My hardware...it's melting!

Analysis
It's not just Windows 98. The Vanishing Hardware nightmare goes hand in hand with almost every OS upgrade, just as the Appearing in Public with No Pants nightmare goes hand in hand with eating pizza at bedtime. But because a lot people upgraded to Windows 98--and didn't closely check the hardware compatibility list Microsoft provides--hardware has been virtually disappearing all over the world.

The most common reason Windows 98 can't find hardware that's actually attached to your PC is because the hardware drivers don't work with the new Windows. (A driver is software that enables communication between your OS and your hardware.) Before you install Windows 98, check that you have the most current drivers by visiting your hardware manufacturer's Web site. Major PC makers usually provide update packs for their most common model. But if you created a custom system, added hardware, or bought your PC from a smaller vendor, you may need to visit the specific hardware manufacturer's Web site to find new drivers. You can also try searching for the hardware maker from the download link in the left margin.

Advice
There's a trick to making hardware reappear after Windows 98 has lost track of it--actually, several tricks. First, find out exactly what hardware is causing the problem. (A missing CD-ROM drive, for instance, might be traced to incompatible drivers for the PC's drive controller card or for the drive itself--and you can't tell which at first glance).

To find the problem hardware, right-click the My Computer icon, select Properties, and then select the Device Manager tab. The offending device will be labeled with yellow circle and exclamation mark over it, or struck with a red X. Double-click on the icon and read the Device status window for more information.

Warning! Warning! Exclamation marks in Device Manager mean something's not working right.
If the problem hardware is Plug and Play compatible, the first step in restoring it is to delete all references to it in the Device Manager. Once it's officially removed, restart Windows, and Windows 98 should redetect the hardware. If it doesn't, the hardware probably isn't really Plug and Play, in which case you have two options: install the hardware manually (using Add New Hardware, a program under Start/Settings/Control Panel), or reinstall the operating system. Trust us--you don't want to reinstall Windows 98 unless you've exhausted all other options.

None of these fixes works, however, for DOS games that won't play sound. The problem is that DOS programs don't recognize Windows drivers. To fix it, go to Start/Run. Type msconfig in the box and click OK. This is a quick way to call up the System Configuration Utility. Select the Autoexec.bat tab, and uncheck the box next to the line that begins BLASTER=. Click OK, then Yes, and crank up those speakers for a sonic gaming experience.


 For SoundBlaster PCI64 and Live cards, visit the Creative Labs Knowledge Base.

 


SUBSIM® Review
© 1995-2020 SUBSIM® Review
"Subsim" is a registered trademark. All rights reserved.
Legal Notice | Privacy Policy

submarine, game, submarine game, wolfpack, u-boat, simulation, subsim, sim