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Old 03-12-2008, 11:46 PM   #46
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WELCOME ABOARD!
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Old 05-29-2008, 08:01 AM   #47
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there we go, the name of that boat has eluded me since i read this post.

the USS Puffer was the submarine that was under for 37 some odd hours.
the men did have to suffer through 125 degree heat, and, when entering a compartment a meager 100 degrees they suffered horrible cases of the shivers, many of them thought they were suffering seziures!
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Old 07-10-2008, 09:37 PM   #48
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Awesome read Top stuff Ducimus
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Old 08-14-2008, 09:25 AM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loftyheights
Hello there, I'm new to SH but find it totally phenom. I like to think I'm fairly knowledgable about WW2 but never realise how much the US sub fleet endoured. You guys know your ****. I knew all about the atlantic war and the major battles in the pacific (midway, guadal canal etc.) but playing SH4 and reading your posts has made me research and it was pretty awful for the sub crews of the US fleet out there.

As I said Im knew to the game, does anyone have 1 particular tip that might help me progress?

Cheers Lofty!
Welcome aboard matey.

And to those who wrote the major part of this thread - many thanks - it all needs saying - many times.
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Old 08-15-2008, 10:36 AM   #50
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Amazing read. I had no idea about most of the things that the US Submariners went through in WW2, though I just got into SH4 tonight. Looking forward to learning my way around these beautiful machines of the deep.
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Old 10-18-2008, 04:59 AM   #51
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Very nicely done sir ! Not only educational but also brought out a strong fighting spirits of US submariners in that troubled era of post Pearl Harbor days.
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Old 11-16-2008, 04:13 PM   #52
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To the Men and the boats of the US Sub fleet in WWII
Following rigorous training of officers and careful selection of crew, life on a sub in WWII was tough, on both the men and the boats. The Us fleet boats were some of the best of their time, and had ammenities that made the long arduous cruises bearable, but heat down below when submerged was often constantly over 100 degrees, and danger surrounded them on every side while in the Patrol area of their patrols, and the journey there and back was long and tough as well. They relied totaly on the judgmenet and eye of the skippers and execs, and every hand was part of the highly complex machine what was the 1940's boat. These were very close quarters, with little privacy other than one's own thoughts, and fears....and the pressures were immense on all hands. Of the active duty men 1 in 4 did not come home. Some few were rescued but many are still on duty with their boats and their exact fate may never be known. What stands out over the years is the bravery and the highest quality of the officers and men, as one looks at aging photographs, one can feel across the interveining time their character and their dedication. There were many heros, known and unkown, and they extended the force and power of the USN and our efforts in the war on the front line with a personal dedication and surrounded by each other in the tiny self contined world of their subs.


Morton, Skipper of the Wahoo (SS-238) and O'Kane Exec plotting an attack

The skipper was the key, for he carried the weight of the boat, along with the Chief of the Boat, and to both of them, everyone turned for leadership both overt and in daily attetntion to duty. The unspoken rule on subs was if you made a mess, you cleaned it up, and you looked out for your shipmates as much as you ever did for yourself and you looked out for the boat first of all. A lookout spotting a smoke trail or a plane might make the differnec between life and death, a successful contact or an empty patrol. We have pictures and history to remember some of these men with, and among the finest were the men of the Fleet Gato class boat USS Wahoo, SS-238 that was launched at Mare Island in 1942 and was sunk on her fifth war patrol, along with her legendary skipper Lieutenant Commander Dudley Morton and her entire crew. Her early successes and dedication to duty brightened those dark days for all in the Service and beyond, and her "clean sweep" mission in 1943 that is recorded in some aging photos shared here was a classic example of what those men and ships faced and accomplished. Remember this was the time of the dud torps, and how they kept going in spite of that, and the huge odds against them at that time.

USS Wahoo (SS-238), 1942-1943
USS Wahoo, a 1525-ton Gato class submarine built at the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, was commissioned in May 1942. She operated off the west coast until August, then deployed to Pearl Harbor to begin combat operations. Wahoo's first war patrol, in the vicinity of Truk from late August into mid-October, sank no Japanese ships, though one freighter was apparently damaged. Her second patrol, in November and December 1942, took her from Pearl Harbor to the waters between Truk and the northern Solomon Islands. She sank a tanker and attacked an enemy submarine before heading for Brisbane, Australia.

On the last day of 1942, Lieutenant Commander Dudley W. Morton took command of Wahoo. In her next war patrol, into the area north of New Guinea in January and February, Morton demonstrated great daring and talent, attacking several Japanese ships, sinking three and leaving others damaged. Wahoo's fourth patrol, out of Pearl Harbor between late February and early April 1943, took her to the East China and Yellow Seas. There her aggressive attacks cost the enemy nine ships. From late April to late May, the submarine operated in the cold waters off Hokkaido and the Kurile Islands. Many ships were attacked, but faulty torpedoes kept the score to only three sinkings. Following this patrol, her fifth, Wahoo went to California for an overhaul.

Torpedo problems contributed greatly to an unsuccessful outcome in Wahoo's sixth war patrol, into the nearly land-locked and essentially "unfished" Sea of Japan during August 1943. In four days inside that target-rich body of water, she attacked nine ships, fired a dozen torpedoes and had misses, broaches or failures to explode in every case. Wahoo returned to the Sea of Japan in September, entering through the narrow strait between Hokkaido and Sakhalin for what was planned to be a stay of three weeks. From Japanese records, it is known that she sank four ships. However, the Japanese also reported a successful anti-submarine attack in the La Pérouse Strait on 11 October. Their target was undoubtedly Wahoo, lost with her entire crew while finishing the active portion of her seventh war patrol.

In an extraordinary combat career that was recognized by the award of a Presidential Unit Citation, USS Wahoo sank twenty enemy ships, at a time when the submarine force was hobbled by unreliable torpedoes. When the Pacific War concluded some twenty-two months later, after torpedo upgrades had helped U.S. submarines slaughter the Japanese logistics fleet, Wahoo was still seventh among them in terms of numbers of ships sunk.

At the end of December 1942, following two lackluster war patrols, USS Wahoo received a new Commanding Officer, the very aggressive and talented Dudley W. Morton. With a spirited pep talk about his intentions and expectations, Morton raised morale among his officers and crew. He implemented a number of innovations, among them placing Executive Officer Richard H. O'Kane at the periscope, so that the Commanding Officer could focus on the complete tactical picture instead of just on what could be seen through that one sensor.
To begin her third war patrol, Wahoo stood out of Brisbane, Australia, in mid-January 1943, with orders to reconnoiter Wewak, a Japanese base on the northern side of New Guinea, then attack shipping in the waters beyond. Using only a home-made chart, on 24 January Morton took his submarine into Wewak harbor, torpedoed and badly damaged the destroyer Harusame at close range and escaped unscathed.

Harusame Damaged Jan 1943 later repaired and returned to service
Taken thru the Scope of the Wahoo

Two days later, Wahoo encountered a convoy, sank a freighter and the transport Buyo Maru and damaged another cargo ship. Wahoo made additional attacks on a tanker and a freighter. Afterwards, she reported by radio: "In ten-hour running gun and torpedo battle destroyed entire convoy of two freighters one transport one tanker ... all torpedoes expended".

Lieutenant Commander Dudley W. Morton, Commanding Officer, with another officer (probably Lieutenant Richard H. O'Kane), in Wahoo's conning tower during her attack on a Japanese convoy north of New Guinea, 26 January 1943. Several ships, among them the transport Buyo Maru, were sunk in this action.


Nittsu Maru (Japanese cargo ship)
Sinking in the Yellow Sea, off China, on 23 March 1943. Periscope photograph, taken from USS Wahoo (SS-238), which had torpedoed her.

After an escort ship thwarted his attempt to use Wahoo's deck gun against another convoy on 27 January, Morton made a second radio report: "Another running gun battle today. Destroyer gunning, Wahoo running". Subsequently, the submarine conducted a photographic reconaissance of Fais Island, near Ulithi Atoll, then headed for Pearl Harbor. She arrived on 7 February 1943, with a broom lashed to her periscope to signify a "clean sweep" of enemy targets. Receiving a hero's welcome, Wahoo's exploits were widely publicized, boosting the confidence of both the American Public and of other members of the Submarine Force
Clean Sweep Feb 1943


The broom lashed to the periscope head, indicating a "clean sweep" of enemy targets encountered; pennant bearing the slogan "Shoot the sunza bitches" and eight small flags, representing claimed sinkings of two Japanese warships and six merchant vessels.

Note that the forward radar mast, mounted in front of the periscope shears, has been censored out of this photograph


A Band to welcome them to Home Port

Morton the Exemplary Skipper


In mid-1942, Lieutenant Commander Morton joined Submarine Squadron FOUR as a Prospective Commanding Officer and briefly was in charge of the elderly submarine Dolphin. After making a patrol on the much-newer Wahoo as an observer, at year's end he became her Commanding Officer. Morton soon proved himself to be one of World War II's most daring and able submarine commanders, an inspiration to many of his colleagues during a period when the Pacific submarine force was shaking off excessively cautious tactical doctrines while simultaneously suffering under the dispiriting burden of unreliable torpedoes. In January and February 1943, he took Wahoo into the waters off northern New Guinea, where several Japanese ships were sunk or seriously damaged, among them the destroyer Harusame, torpedoed after an almost incredibly bold penetration of Wewak harbor, and the transport Buyo Maru.

Buyo Maru Sinking
From February into October 1943, Commander Morton took Wahoo on four more patrols, covering enemy-controlled waters in the shallow Yellow Sea, off Northern Japan and into the Sea of Japan. Continuing to use innovative attack techniques, including placing his Executive Officer at the periscope, thus allowing the captain to fully visualize the entire situation, he sank another sixteen ships. Only one patrol, in the Sea of Japan in August, was unproductive, with poor torpedo performance as a contributing cause. Morton and Wahoo returned to the same area in September, at a cost to the Japanese cargo fleet of four ships. However, on 11 October 1943 while exiting the Sea of Japan through La Pérouse Strait, Wahoo was lost with all hands.

In his five war patrols, Dudley W. Morton had sunk a total of nineteen enemy ships, of some 55,000 tons, making him one of the Pacific War's top three submarine commanders in terms of ships sunk. His achievements were recognized by the award of no less than four Navy Crosses, the last one posthumous, and a Presidential Unit Citation for Wahoo.

The destroyer USS Morton (DD-948), 1959-1992, was named in honor of Commander Dudley W. Morton.

Danger is a Daily Routine
Crew of the Wahoo under attack by depth charges at 300 ft in 1943

Scene in the control room during Wahoo's 27 January 1943 action with a Japanese destroyer. When the photo was taken the submarine was at 300 feet, rigged for depth charges. Six charges had just gone off and the crew was awaiting more. Lieutenant Commander Dudley W. Morton, Wahoo's Commanding Officer, reported this action as: "Another running gun fight ... destroyer gunning ... Wahoo running". Shaved head on crewman at right is a product of an Equator crossing ceremony three days previously.

Exec O'Kane gets his own boat

Lieutenant Commander Dudley W. Morton, USN,Commanding Officer, USS Wahoo (SS-238), at right
With his Executive Officer, Lieutenant Richard H. O'Kane in Pearl Harbor 1943

O'Kane was detached to command the new boat Tang (SS-306)in 1943, and went on to be one of the most successful sub skippers in the way accounting for 24 Japanese ships, his boat sank from an accidental detonation from their own last fish at the end of a very succcesful patrol, it circled around and sank the Tang but not until she and O'Kane has decimated a Japanese convoy enroute with planes stacked on the decks to help in the Battle of Leyte Gulf, this was the text of the Medal of Honor Citation describing it:

Medal of Honor citation of Commander Richard Hetherington O'Kane (as printed in his official biography):

"For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as Commanding Officer of the USS TANG operating against two enemy Japanese convoys on October 23 and 24, 1944, during her Fifth and last War Patrol. Boldly maneuvering on the surface into the midst of a heavily escorted convoy, Commander O'Kane stood in a fusillade of bullets and shells from all directions to launch smashing hits on three tankers, coolly swung his ship to fire at a freighter and, in a split second decision, shot out of the path of an onrushing transport, missing it by inches. Boxed in by blazing tankers, a freighter, transport and several destroyers, he blasted two of the targets with his remaining torpedoes and, with pyrotechnics bursting on all sides, cleared the area. Twenty-four hours later, he again made contact with a heavily escorted convoy steaming to support the Leyte campaign with reinforcements and supplies and with crated planes piled high on each unit. In defiance of the enemy' relentless fire, he closed the concentration of ships and in quick succession sent two torpedoes each into the first and second transports and an adjacent tanker, finding his mark with each torpedo in a series of violent explosions at less than a thousand-yard range. With ships bearing down from all sides, he charged the enemy at high speed, exploding the tanker in a burst of flame, smashing the transport dead in the water and blasting the destroyer with a mighty roar which rocked the TANG from stem to stern. Expending his last two torpedoes into the remnants of a once powerful convoy before his own ship went down, Commander O'Kane aided by his gallant command, achieved an illustrious record of heroism in combat, enhancing the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service."

O'Kane was taken prisoner by the Japanese and held secretly until the end of the war.He later became a much respected Commander of several sub squadrons and the Sub School at New Groton.

In the end, it was men, ordinary but extrodinary men like Morton and O'Kane and all their crews that made the submarine war in the Pacific one of the most effective arms of all of the Allied efforts to stop the Japanese Empire.

To those who remain alive and the few boats that we have with us and to those boats and men who did not return, these thoughs and thanks are dedicated. We owe them so much, and they gave us all they had, and experiencing this in this remarkable sim is a way to honour their memory and their courage.

All Photographs are from the offical USN Historical Collection and are declared in the public domain as being taken by active duty US military personell. The Music clip is to give a sense of the fragile link that existed between the base in Pearl and the boats at sea, and the joy they must have felt on return.


SSN Wahoo Returning to the War deparitng Mare Island after refit in 1943

The Boats that survive....
Gato class
USS Silversides (Muskegon, Michigan)
USS Drum (Mobile, Alabama)
USS Cobia (Manitowoc, Wisconsin)
USS Cod (Cleveland, Ohio)










Balao class
USS Bowfin (Honolulu, Hawaii)
USS Pampanito (San Francisco, California)
USS Lionfish (Fall River, Massachusetts
USS Becuna (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
USS Batfish(Muskogee, Oklahoma)










Tench class
USS Torsk (Baltimore, Maryland)

Of all of these boats, I believe only the Cod remains in totally intact condition, no holes cut in pressure hull, exactly as she was in commission. There may be additional boats in mothballs or other locations, but these boats are all open to the public and a memorial to the gallant silent service.


During four years of war,the USN sub fleet were responsible for the sinking more than 600,000 tons of Japanese warships and more than 5,000,000 tons of merchant shipping. The Sub force never numbered over 2% of the Fleet at any time.This work was vital to cutting off the supplies and materials that Japan needed to continue the war and contributed a great deal to the final peace.

A Music Sample from Pearl from that time that the crews might have heard on KGMB out of Honolulu as they thankfully returned to port after a war patrol. When the Sun Goes down - Kalama's Quartet.

http://files.filefront.com/When+The+.../fileinfo.html

And i think it is appropriate to consider the Imperial Japanese Navy and their submarine force as well. They were hampered by many things as well, severe Fleet Doctrine restrictions on their operational range of mission, i.e forces to be picket boats and escorts for fleet units in main doctrine at war start, not allowed to use their potential and range, and many other material and war related challenges later on. They were equally brave, and dedicated to their duty and achived some successes in the face of the odds as well. The INJ subs were marvels of development, and surpasses anything achieved by other navies in general with the larger boats, tho there were occasional unique units in the RN and French navy equal in some ways. In the end, the Peace that came from this war brought peace and understanding to both sides and it is a marvel to see INJ veterans and USN veterans discussing their war time encounters in reunioins and private, but as the years go by, fewer and fewer of both sides are present for muster, and our thoughts and respect must remind us of their dedication to service and to us all.




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Last edited by Admiral Von Gerlach; 12-07-2008 at 04:36 PM.
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Old 12-01-2008, 03:18 PM   #53
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I didn't know the Darter was still there on the reef. Amazing! The Dace and the Darter ambushed some Imperial heavy ships of the line at Leyte. Truly wolves of the Pacific.

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Old 12-02-2008, 12:33 PM   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Admiral Von Gerlach

The Boats that survive....
Gato class
USS Silversides (Muskegon, Michigan)
USS Drum (Mobile, Alabama)
USS Cobia (Manitowoc, Wisconsin)
USS Cod (Cleveland, Ohio)








Balao class
USS Bowfin (Honolulu, Hawaii)
USS Pampanito (San Francisco, California)
USS Lionfish (Fall River, Massachusetts
USS Becuna (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)








Tench class
USS Torsk (Baltimore, Maryland)

Of all of these boats, I believe only the Cod remains in totally intact condition, no holes cut in pressure hull, exactly as she was in commission. There may be additional boats in mothballs or other locations, but these boats are all open to the public and a memorial to the gallant silent service.







Do not forget about the U.S.S. Batfish, or the Razorback, both Balao class boats, that are still around for the public to see. Razorback has undergone the guppy conversion though. Batfish is still in WWII condition minus her deck gun. It seems as though Batfish is a lesser known submarine, even though it holds a very significant record: sinking 3 Japanese submarines within 76 hours, a record still held to this day.

To find out more info on the Batfish and all other museums boats, visit http://www.submarinemuseums.org
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Old 12-07-2008, 04:38 PM   #55
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Oh my, sorry about that Capt Fyfe and the Batfish ...how could they be left out! sorry about that, will add info soon.
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Old 12-08-2008, 04:18 PM   #56
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I didn't see Cavalla there either.
http://s231.photobucket.com/albums/e...ark%20Cleanup/
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Old 01-09-2009, 10:38 AM   #57
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OUTSTANDING READ...AND PICS!
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Old 01-09-2009, 12:51 PM   #58
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Yeah, some good stuff for sure


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Old 04-17-2009, 11:35 PM   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shoot-kill-win View Post
Do not forget about the U.S.S. Batfish, or the Razorback, both Balao class boats, that are still around for the public to see. Razorback has undergone the guppy conversion though. Batfish is still in WWII condition minus her deck gun. It seems as though Batfish is a lesser known submarine, even though it holds a very significant record: sinking 3 Japanese submarines within 76 hours, a record still held to this day.

To find out more info on the Batfish and all other museums boats, visit http://www.submarinemuseums.org

I live about 50 miles from the Batfish's current berth. I've only had the opprotunity to stop by once, about 4 years ago. Pretty nice place, but I don't like how shes just sitting in the dirt, no blocks or nothing underneath. Kind of sad looking. But at least she survived the chopping block I guess. I just wonder what the bottom of her hull looks like? I'm going to try and make it back up that way this summer, I don't go to Tulsa quite as much as I used to. Hopefully she looks better than the picture they have on their website, looks like she needs a paint job!
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Old 08-26-2009, 02:46 AM   #60
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http://www.hnsa.org/doc/subreports.htm

im really in love with this site, just found it, and searched this thread for it and couldnt find any matches. so i thought id link it.
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