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-   -   Development Updates (https://www.subsim.com/radioroom/showthread.php?t=226377)

PL_Andrev 04-10-2021 01:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Usurpator (Post 2741413)
Yes! Check out the latest development update on Steam: https://store.steampowered.com/news/...73656378969501

1) Ocean surface
It looks really gorgeous.
Of course still some features are missing (foam, bow waves, stern foam), but looks very very promising.
And - one of the best undersea view I've ever seen.

2) Uboat interior
Just... wow. A lot of compartments not textured yet, but final effect for few compartments is brilliant. A HUGE step forward acc. current game.

3) Net-code
Fo me it was a waste of time, but this is very good info that the reason for re-coding net code is PvP. Fantastic.

4) Merchant fleet
Everyone are waiting for new ships, and unfortunately this is the weakest part of this update.
Looking for ships hull a lot of work in front of Koji, before reach Flower class quality.

Konrad Friedrich 04-10-2021 06:02 AM

Uboat interior
 
Thanks for the latest update.
Glad to see it in a somewhat more compelling and informative form.

But one thing struck me right away.
The interior. More precisely: the textures.

If a Uboat would be so dirty, with stains all over the the walls and wooden surfaces or the placeholder textures of smeared diesel engines, the commander would certainly impose a vacation and shore leave ban. He would probably roar quite loudly while doing so...
Apart from the fact that the petty officers would run through the boat assigning extra shifts for the cleaning service until everything is sparkling clean. They probably wouldn't sound very friendly either.

It may be that the German Uboats were not known for being particularly hygienic - but dirty and scruffy, that should probably not happen in any navy in the world.

Anyone who has ever sailed a Navy ship knows that cleaning (and derusting and painting) is one of the main occupations of the lower ranks.

A filthy Uboat like this is quite unrealitic.

kozel1 04-10-2021 08:28 AM

Thanks for the great update!

Regarding the Uboat cleanliness:
German Uboats were a filthy, stinky, moldy, disgusting places with minimal hygiene. Cleanliness was not a priority. The constant humidity made those steel tubs a very unpleasant place.
The conditions may have been slightly better on the US submarines during ww2, but the German Uboats. Nah, their priorities were elsewhere.
The way it's portrayed on those pictures, is perfectly fine.

Onkel Neal 04-10-2021 09:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Konrad Friedrich (Post 2741535)
Thanks for the latest update.
Glad to see it in a somewhat more compelling and informative form.

But one thing struck me right away.
The interior. More precisely: the textures.

If a Uboat would be so dirty, with stains all over the the walls and wooden surfaces or the placeholder textures of smeared diesel engines, the commander would certainly impose a vacation and shore leave ban. He would probably roar quite loudly while doing so...
Apart from the fact that the petty officers would run through the boat assigning extra shifts for the cleaning service until everything is sparkling clean. They probably wouldn't sound very friendly either.

It may be that the German Uboats were not known for being particularly hygienic - but dirty and scruffy, that should probably not happen in any navy in the world.

Anyone who has ever sailed a Navy ship knows that cleaning (and derusting and painting) is one of the main occupations of the lower ranks.

A filthy Uboat like this is quite unrealitic.

I don't know about that. Sure, naval vessels in general are kept in a high state of cleanliness, but WWII diesel boats (aka pigboats), especially U-boats were not clean at all (from my readings). They were cramped, smelly, very damp, and hard to clean. Das Boot (the book) gave me the impression that U-boats were looked down upon by the surface navy.

ceh 04-11-2021 10:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Konrad Friedrich (Post 2741535)
A filthy Uboat like this is quite unrealitic.

Please don't take this the wrong way, but how do you know, were you on one during the war?

derstosstrupp 04-11-2021 11:56 AM

Fwiw, at 7 AM every day was an activity called “Reinschiff”. We call it “field day” in the US military, but it’s an all-hands cleaning time. Cleaning was somewhat of a perpetual thing aboard the boat, because there was always one or two sailors tasked with doing miscellaneous things aboard between watch times, including cleaning.

In short, an excessively dirty boat is indeed not historical.

Also, not quite fair to say just because you haven’t been there means you don’t know. That’s what historical research using good source material is aimed to do - understand how things were without having been there.

derprophet 04-11-2021 12:24 PM

Stosstrupp is indeed right, completely a-historical.

ceh 04-11-2021 01:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by derstosstrupp (Post 2741761)
Also, not quite fair to say just because you havenít been there means you donít know. Thatís what historical research using good source material is aimed to do - understand how things were without having been there.

That is not what I wrote. Please don't twist my words :) I asked how he knows, and wondered if he was actually there - not "if you weren't you can't possibly know".

As for historical material - fair point, but we all know that not everything was always photographed etc.

Now, I'm not positively claiming it's this or that way, rather questioning the certainty with which some people claim it could not possibly have been dirty.

derprophet 04-11-2021 02:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ceh (Post 2741778)
That is not what I wrote. Please don't twist my words :) I asked how he knows, and wondered if he was actually there - not "if you weren't you can't possibly know".

As for historical material - fair point, but we all know that not everything was always photographed etc.

Now, I'm not positively claiming it's this or that way, rather questioning the certainty with which some people claim it could not possibly have been dirty.

It wasn't a sterile atmosphere nor was it a dirty one. The boat was cleaned daily.

derstosstrupp 04-11-2021 02:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ceh (Post 2741778)
That is not what I wrote. Please don't twist my words :) I asked how he knows, and wondered if he was actually there - not "if you weren't you can't possibly know".

As for historical material - fair point, but we all know that not everything was always photographed etc.

Now, I'm not positively claiming it's this or that way, rather questioning the certainty with which some people claim it could not possibly have been dirty.

It’s just normally when somebody says something to that effect, it’s trying to discredit. Maybe asking for his source is a better approach?

But you’re right, he could be a hundred-year-old Subsim member :doh:.

ceh 04-11-2021 06:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by derstosstrupp (Post 2741793)
Maybe asking for his source is a better approach?

Probably :)


Quote:

Originally Posted by derstosstrupp (Post 2741793)
But youíre right, he could be a hundred-year-old Subsim member :doh:.

Believe it or not, the timeframe completely slipped my mind. Although that would have been cool!

Onkel Neal 04-12-2021 09:25 AM

I'm trying to remember where I read it, perhaps it was an account of the capture of U-505... anyway, the impression was the boat was filthy, shockingly. I'll try to remember, maybe it was an outlier.

kozel1 04-12-2021 10:09 AM

Regarding the capture of U-505, here is an eyewitness account:

Don Carter, 93, Norwalk, Calif.

A radio communications signalman on the Guadalcanal, Carter has visited U-505 many times, and some of his personal artifacts, including his pistol, are on display. "The most exciting thing was when (the submarine) surfaced, and the Germans were coming through the conning tower and jumping in the water, evacuating the sub. That was the most exciting time." Carter, who boarded the sub after the first boarding crew, also remembers: "You have never smelled something like that. Those guys had been to sea for 89 days and didn't have any baths. And when that water rushed in there and got on those old dirty clothes and got everything else wet ó you've never smelled anything like it."

Source: https://www.chicagotribune.com/enter...604-story.html

derstosstrupp 04-12-2021 10:27 AM

Makes sense. Late-war boat spending most of its time submerged. Not much can be done about the smell, hell they (505) had a bucket in the middle of the gangway in the diesel room for doing your business. The smell was even bad to an extent when the boats could primarily stay surfaced. But regardless, there was always cleaning happening, as far as dirt was concerned, it was mitigated to the extent they could mitigate it.

Derprophet hit the nail on the head - wasnít sterile, but wasnít ďfilthyĒ either. Daily Reinschiff was/is an old German naval tradition and was a part of the typical U-boat schedule.

Torpex77 04-12-2021 09:46 PM

Navy
 
Peace Time Navy: Nothing to do but Clean, paint and prepare for inspections.

War Time Navy: Hunt-Kill-Reload..repeat!

Now, My second Boat and Old 637 Class, we pulled in for an ORSE (Nuke Reactor Operation Inspection). I was tasked to take Money and 2 helpers and go Get PIZZA! When I returned and got Near the hatch, I smelled this wretched, aweful Putrid Smell.....It was coming out of the Boat. We were submerged for about 45 days. )) Oh and we were clean inside too))


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